• Emergency:01542 882209

Dog Advice

Advice and information for the best life possible with your dog

Getting a New Puppy

The first night in its new home is usually the most stressful night for any breed. Make it as comforting as possible with a ticking clock wrapped in its blanket or leave the radio on to soothe it to sleep. Desides that, you should:

  • Choose washable bedding
  • Confine your puppy to a section of the house so that you have control over its toilet training
  • Make sure that kitchen rubbish and any other visible dangers such as large houseplants or pots are out of reach

Some clients prefer to bring their new pup in a pet carrier to the vet. They feel safer in the car when they are very young and they are not exposed to any sick animals in the waiting room.

Toys and chewing

Choose enough toys so that your furniture remains untouched by tiny teeth. Be careful not to give them toys that look like the items you want them to avoid chewing such as a shoe. Balls and knotted ropes are good but avoid games that encourage your puppy to fight with you and that makes it growl.

If your puppy continuously tries to chew your hands, discourage it by squeaking to give it a fright and distract it. Make a fist to hide your fingers and hide your hands if it perseveres. If encouraged you may end up with a biting dog.

Collars

Your pup can be fitted with a collar from when they are very little. It should fit snuggly but allow for one or two fingers width of space between collar and neck. Loosen the collar as they grow.

Diet

Choose a good quality food that you want to keep him on. Dry foods tend to be better for their teeth, especially in the smaller breeds that live longer and can suffer with dental disease if they only eat a soft food diet. Puppies have a tiny stomach so divide their feeds up into four meals initially. Always provide fresh water.

Large breed puppies should be fed a puppy food specially designed for large breed dogs. They can grow too quickly on a normal high protein puppy food and suffer with joint disease. The large breed puppy foods balance the ratio of protein and carbohydrate so that your pet does not grow too fast.

Parasites

Make sure that your puppy is wormed too with their first vaccination if the breeder has not already done so, as most puppies will have worms from their mothers. Any sign of fleas will need treatment too by us. Frontline spot on can start from 6 weeks of age.     

Training and Socialising

Start training your puppy at an early age to build up a good relationship with your new companion. Start basic discipline which involves being consistent with what you say and do. Be patient as dogs have short memories. Correct your puppy when his behaviour is inappropriate but lavish him with praise as a positive reinforcement when it is right. Never resort to physical punishment.

Puppies need to know their place in the pecking order at home. They will be much happier, better adjusted pets if you can follow some simple guidelines, designed to mimic the wolf pack principle of "the top dog (the alpha male) goes first, feeds first, and leads". Feed your pup after you have eaten.

Once vaccinated, you can start to socialise your pup but do not overdo the exercise. Your puppy will probably love being out and want to go for a lot further than it should. Over-exercising at a young age could adversely affect his growth, especially in the larger breed dogs.

Most of all, enjoy your time with your new pet. You will forget the time when you didn't have such a devoted, non-judgemental, faithful, happy companion in your life.

Vomiting in Dogs

Vomiting and/or diarrhoea are two of the most common ailments we see at Seafield Vets. All dogs will occasionally vomit. In the wild, they feed their young with regurgitated food and so vomiting is physiologically almost normal under certain circumstances.

The general rule is that if the vomiting is only occasional, of recent duration and if your pet is reasonably bright, then probably there is not too much to worry about. A pet that is about to vomit will start to salivate or lick their lips constantly. This is also a sign of feeling nauseous.

Causes of vomiting

Swallowed 'foreign bodies' can be anything from a sock or your child's toy to the most common - the end of a dummy. Many smaller foreign bodies will cause initial vomiting but then pass on their own accord. However, they occasionally become lodged and become a surgical emergency.

Parasites such as roundworm are often the culprits in causing partial blockages in the intestines, especially in puppies. If you have not wormed your dog or cat in the past three months, it may be worth doing so with a broad spectrum wormer.  

Dietary problems are a common cause of vomiting whether they are primary (over-eating, gorging, too rich/too fatty food) or secondary to some other cause of vomiting, such as a bacterial infection.

Metabolic diseases such as kidney disease or liver disease can lead to vomiting. They usually present with other symptoms as well and your pet will need to be booked in.

Poisons, but it depends on the type of poison. Always bring in a sample of the vomit or a sample of whatever plant or chemical you have seen your pet eating. Infections of the stomach (gastritis) often effect the upper intestine so that your dog may also present with diarrhoea.

Gastric ulcers occur in dogs. If your pet vomits blood on several occasions and/or black tar-like faeces (digested blood is present) are passed, then this is an emergency and your pet must be booked in straight away. Call our Keith Surgery immediately on 01542 882209.

A major emergency in dogs is gastric dilatation and torsion syndrome. This usually occurs in giant and deep chested breeds such as German Shepherds. Your dog may try to vomit but only produces phlegm, not food. This is an acute emergency and immediate surgical care is required. Call our Keith Surgery immediately on 01542 882209.

Dog Behaviour

Tips for avoiding behavioural problems

  • Set rules immediately and stick to them
  • Avoid situations that promote inappropriate behaviour
  • Observe your pet and provide what it needs to be cared for and attended to
  • Supervise your new pet diligently through undivided individual attention and training
  • Restrict your pet’s access to a limited area of the house until training is complete
  • Encourage good behaviour with lavish praise and attention
  • Correct bad behaviours by providing positive alternatives (such as a toy for a slipper, a scratching post for a sofa)
  • Never physically punish or force compliance to commands - this may lead to fear biting or aggression
  • Don’t play roughly or encourage aggression or play biting
  • Expose pets to people, animals and environments where you want them to live

Ask to see any of our veterinary surgeons or nurses if serious or unresolved behavioural problems exist. Request an appointment here.

Practice information

Keith Surgery

Back
  • Mon
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    8:00am - 4:00pm
  • Sun
    Emergencies only

Emergency Details

Please call:

01542 882209
Back

Find us here:

144 Land Street Keith Banffshire AB55 5DL
get directions with Google Maps
Back

Please call this number for emergencies:

01542 882209

Buckie Surgery

Back
  • Mon
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    8:00am - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    8:00am - 5:00pm
  • Sun
    Closed

Emergency Details

Please call:

01542 882209
Back

Find us here:

8-10 High Street Buckie Banffshire AB56 1QA
get directions with Google Maps
Back

Please call this number for emergencies:

01542 882209

Bellevue Veterinary Centre

Back
  • Mon
    9:30am - 10:30am, 11.30am - 12:30pm, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    9:30am - 10:30am, 11.30am - 12:30pm, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    9:30am - 10:30am, 11.30am - 12:30pm, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    9:30am - 10:30am, 11.30am - 12:30pm, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    9:30am - 10:30am, 11.30am - 12:30pm, 2:00pm - 3:00pm, 4:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    11:30am - 2:00pm
  • Sun
    Closed
Back

Find us here:

43 Castle Street Banff AB45 1DQ
get directions with Google Maps